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 Assignment 9 (Due: September 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)

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creza_jill_bulacito

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PostSubject: assignment 9   Thu Oct 01, 2009 3:33 pm

Interview a personnel/human resource manager on his concept on the nature, scope and role of human resource management. Do you agree with him? Explain. Is his concept similar to that of the management of his organization? If not, ask him how the differences are settled.

Human Resource Management has come to be recognized as an inherent part of management, which is concerned with the human resources of an organization. Its objective is the maintenance of better human relations in the organization by the development, application and evaluation of policies, procedures and programmes relating to human resources to optimize their contribution towards the realization of organizational objectives.

In other words, HRM is concerned with getting better results with the collaboration of people. It is an integral but distinctive part of management, concerned with people at work and their relationships within the enterprise. HRM helps in attaining maximum individual development, desirable working relationship between employees and employers, employees and employees, and effective modeling of human resources as contrasted with physical resources. It is the recruitment, selection, development, utilization, compensation and motivation of human resources by the organization.

Human Resource Management: Evolution

The early part of the century saw a concern for improved efficiency through careful design of work. During the middle part of the century emphasis shifted to the employee's productivity. Recent decades have focused on increased concern for the quality of working life, total quality management and worker's participation in management. These three phases may be termed as welfare, development and empowerment.

http://expertscolumn.com/content/human-resource-management-nature-scope-objectives-and-function

Human Resources Manager


The current business and legal climate have changed both the function and the status of the human resources manager in many organizations. Employers worry about frequent or expensive legal claims by employees, particularly in relation to discrimination and downsizing. At the same time, hiring, training, and keeping skilled employees has become a priority for businesses concerned about their competitiveness. As a result, the professional expertise required for the human resources function has increased.


http://www.hrpolicyanswers.com/xstore/catalog/HUMAN-RESOURCES-MANAGER-Writing-and-Decision-Making-Kit-p-31.html

Humans are an organization's greatest assets; without them, everyday business functions such as managing cash flow, making business transactions, communicating through all forms of media, and dealing with customers could not be completed. Humans and the potential they possess drive an organization. Today's organizations are continuously changing. Organizational change impacts not only the business but also its employees. In order to maximize organizational effectiveness, human potential—individuals' capabilities, time, and talents—must be managed. Human resource management works to ensure that employees are able to meet the organization's goals.

"Human resource management is responsible for how people are treated in organizations. It is responsible for bringing people into the organization, helping them perform their work, compensating them for their labors, and solving problems that arise" (Cherrington, 1995, p. 5). There are seven management functions of a human resources (HR) department that will be specifically addressed: staffing, performance appraisals, compensation and benefits, training and development, employee and labor relations, safety and health, and human resource research.

Generally, in small organizations—those with fewer than a hundred employees—there may not be an HR department, and so a line manager will be responsible for the functions of HRM. In large organizations—those with a hundred employees or more—a human resource manager will coordinate the HRM duties and report directly to the chief executive officer (CEO). HRM staff in larger organizations may include human resource generalists and human resource specialists. As the name implies, an HR generalist is routinely involved with all seven HRM functions, while the HR specialist focuses attention on only one of the seven responsibilities.

Prior to discussing the seven functions, it is necessary to understand the job analysis. An essential component of any HR unit, no matter the size, is the job analysis, which is completed to determine activities, skills, and knowledge required of an employee for a specific job. Job analyses are "performed on three occasions: (1) when the organization is first started, (2) when a new job is created, and (3) when a job is changed as a result of new methods, new procedures, or new technology" (Cherrington, 1995).

Jobs can be analyzed through the use of questionnaires, observations, interviews, employee recordings, or a combination of any of these methods. Two important tools used in defining the job are (1) a job description, which identifies the job, provides a listing of responsibilities and duties unique to the job, gives performance standards, and specifies necessary machines and equipment; and (2) the job specification, which states the minimum amount of education and experience needed for performing the job (Mondy and Noe, 1996).

Staffing

Both the job description and the job specification are useful tools for the staffing process, the first of the seven HR functions to be discussed. Someone (e.g., a department manager) or some event (e.g., an employee's leaving) within the organization usually determines a need to hire a new employee. In large organizations, an employee requisition must be submitted to the HR department that specifies the job title, the department, and the date the employee is needed. From there, the job description can be referenced for specific job related qualifications to provide more detail when advertising the position—either internally, externally, or both (Mondy and Noe, 1996).

Not only must the HR department attract qualified applicants through job postings or other forms of advertising, but it also assists in screening candidates' resumes and bringing those with the proper qualifications in for an interview. The final say in selecting the candidate will probably be the line manager's, assuming all Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) requirements are met. Other ongoing staffing responsibilities involve planning for new or changing positions and reviewing current job analyses and job descriptions to make sure they accurately reflect the current position.

Performance Appraisal

Once a talented individual is brought into an organization, another function of HRM comes into play—creating an environment that will motivate and reward exemplary performance. One way to assess performance is through a formal review on a periodic basis, generally annually, known as a performance appraisal or performance evaluation. Because line managers are in daily contact with the employees and can best measure performance, they are usually the ones who conduct the appraisals. Other evaluators of the employee's performance can include subordinates, peers, group, and self, or a combination of one or more (Mondy and Noe, 1996).

Just as there can be different performance evaluators, depending on the job, several appraisal systems can be used. Some of the popular appraisal methods include (1) ranking of all employees in a group; (2) using rating scales to define above-average, average, and below-average performance; (3) recording favorable and unfavorable performance, known as critical incidents; and (4) managing by objectives, or MBO (Mondy and Noe, 1996).

Cherrington (1995) illustrates how performance appraisals serve several purposes, including:(1) guiding human resource actions such as hiring, firing, and promoting; (2) rewarding employees through bonuses, promotions, and so on;(3) providing feedback and noting areas of improvement; (4) identifying training and development needs in order to improve the individual's performance on the job; and (5) providing job related data useful in human resource planning.

Compensation and Benefits

Compensation (payment in the form of hourly wages or annual salaries) and benefits (insurance, pensions, vacation, modified workweek, sick days, stock options, etc.) can be a catch-22 because an employee's performance can be influenced by compensation and benefits, and vice versa. In the ideal situation, employees feel they are paid what they are worth, are rewarded with sufficient benefits, and receive some intrinsic satisfaction (good work environment, interesting work, etc.). Compensation should be legal and ethical, adequate, motivating, fair and equitable, cost-effective, and able to provide employment security (Cherrington, 1995).

Training and Development

Performance appraisals not only assist in determining compensation and benefits, but they are also instrumental in identifying ways to help individuals improve their current positions and prepare for future opportunities. As the structure of organizations continues to change—through downsizing or expansion—the need for training and development programs continues to grow. Improving or obtaining new skills is part of another area of HRM, known as training and development.

"Training focuses on learning the skills, knowledge, and attitudes required to initially perform a job or task or to improve upon the performance of a current job or task, while development activities are not job related, but concentrate on broadening the employee's horizons" (Nadler and Wiggs, 1986, p. 5). Education, which focuses on learning new skills, knowledge, and attitudes to be used in future work, also deserves mention (Nadler and Wiggs, 1986).

Because the focus is on the current job, only training and development will be discussed. Training can be used in a variety of ways, including (1) orienting and informing employees, (2) developing desired skills, (3) preventing accidents through safety training, (4) supplying professional and technical education, and (5) providing supervisory training and executive education (Cherrington, 1995).

Each of the training methods mentioned has benefits to the individual as well as to the organization. Some of the benefits are reducing the learning time for new hires, teaching employees how to use new or updated technology, decreasing the number and cost of accidents because employees know how to operate a machine properly, providing better customer service, improving quality and quantity of productivity, and obtaining management involvement in the training process (Cherrington, 1995). When managers go through the training, they are showing others that they are taking the goals of training seriously and are committed to the importance of human resource development.

The type of training depends on the material to be learned, the length of time learners have, and the financial resources available. One type is instructor-led training, which generally allows participants to see a demonstration and to work with the product first-hand. On-the-job training and apprenticeships let participants acquire new skills as they continue to perform various aspects of the job. Computer-based training (CBT) provides learners at various geographic locations access to material to be learned at convenient times and locations. Simulation exercises give participants a chance to learn outcomes of choices in a nonthreatening environment before applying the concept to real situations.

Training focuses on the current job, while development concentrates on providing activities to help employees expand their current knowledge and to allow for growth. Types of development opportunities include mentoring, career counseling, management and supervisory development, and job training (Cherrington, 1995).

Employee and Labor Relations

Just as human resource developers make sure employees have proper training, there are groups of employees organized as unions to address and resolve employment-related issues. Unions have been around since the time of the American Revolution (Mondy and Noe, 1996). Those who join unions usually do so for one or both of two reasons— to increase wages and/or to eliminate unfair conditions. Some of the outcomes of union involvement include better medical plans, extended vacation time, and increased wages (Cherrington, 1995).

Today, unions remain a controversial topic. Under the provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act, the closed-shop arrangement states employees (outside the construction industry) are not required to join a union when they are hired. Union-shop arrangements permit employers to hire non-union workers contingent upon their joining the union once they are hired. The Taft-Hartley Act gives employers the right to file unfair labor practice complaints against the union and to express their views concerning unions (Cherrington, 1995).

Not only do HR managers deal with union organizations, but they are also responsible for resolving collective bargaining issues—namely, the contract. The contract defines employment related issues such as compensation and benefits, working conditions, job security, discipline procedures, individuals' rights, management's rights, and contract length. Collective bargaining involves management and the union trying to resolve any issues peacefully—before the union finds it necessary to strike or picket and/or management decides to institute a lockout (Cherrington, 1995).

Safety and Health

Not only must an organization see to it that employees' rights are not violated, but it must also provide a safe and healthy working environment. Mondy and Noe (1996) define safety as "protecting employees from injuries caused by work-related accidents" and health as keeping "employees free from physical or emotional illness" (p. 432). In order to prevent injury or illness, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970. Through workplace inspections, citations and penalties, and on-site consultations, OSHA seeks to enhance safety and health and to decrease accidents, which lead to decreased productivity and increased operating costs (Cherrington, 1995).

Health problems recognized in the workplace can include the effects of smoking, alcohol and drug/substance abuse, AIDS, stress, and burnout. Through employee assistance programs (EAPs), employees with emotional difficulties are given "the same consideration and assistance" as those employees with physical illnesses (Mondy and Noe, 1996, p. 455).

Human Resource Research

In addition to recognizing workplace hazards, organizations are responsible for tracking safety- and health-related issues and reporting those statistics to the appropriate sources. The human resources department seems to be the storehouse for maintaining the history of the organization— everything from studying a department's high turnover or knowing the number of people presently employed, to generating statistics on the percentages of women, minorities, and other demographic characteristics. Data for the research can be gathered from a number of sources, including surveys/questionnaires, observations, interviews, and case studies (Cherrington, 1995). This research better enables organizations to predict cyclical trends and to properly recruit and select employees.

Conclusion

Research is part of all the other six functions of human resource management. With the number of organizations participating in some form of international business, the need for HRM research will only continue to grow. Therefore, it is important for human resource professionals to be up to date on the latest trends in staffing, performance appraisals, compensation and benefits, training and development, employee and labor relations, and safety and health issues— both in the United States and in the global market.

One professional organization that provides statistics to human resource managers is the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the largest professional organization for human resource management professionals. Much of the research conducted within organizations is sent to SHRM to be used for compiling international statistics.

http://www.answers.com/topic/human-resource-management
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Fritzielaine A. Barcena

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 9 (Due: September 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sun Oct 11, 2009 10:10 pm




People are the real assets of an organization. If treated well, they can take organizations to commanding heights. Two plus two could be four or even ten. Human Resource Development (HRD) stresses that human beings have the potential to do things better and hence it is a very positive concept in the human resource management. It is based on the belief that an investment in human beings is necessary and will invariably bring in substantial benefits in the long run. Therefore, HRD is a process in which the employees of an organization are helped/motivated to acquire and develop technical, managerial and behavioral knowledge, skills and abilities, and mould the values, beliefs, attitude necessary to perform ...
NATURE:
It describes this concept with help of a matrix. In this presentation, both the smaller and larger organization has been compared. It also provides matrix with help of an example of a company. Organizations typically divide managers into two groups: Line managers and Staff managers. The concept of matrix management is very instrumental in the success of the organization and provides stability to the organization.

SCOPE:
The scope of HRM is very wide:
1. Personnel aspect-This is con¬cerned with manpower planning, recruitment, selection, place¬ment, transfer, promotion, train¬ing and development, layoff and retrenchment, remuneration, incentives, productivity etc.
2. Welfare aspect-It deals with working conditions and ameni¬ties such as canteens, creches, rest and lunch rooms, housing, transport, medical assistance, education, health and safety, recreation facilities, etc.
3. Industrial relations aspect-This covers union-management rela¬tions, joint consultation, collec¬tive bargaining, grievance and disciplinary procedures, settle¬ment of disputes, etc.
ROLE:
The human resource function has gone from the traditional hire and fire role to a strategic partner at the table with finance, operations and other business centers that are not centers of profit for the organization. The job of HR, as is the job of all such departments, is to ensure that the business gets the most out of its employees. Another way to put this is that the human resource management needs to provide a high return on the business's investment in its people. This makes it a highly complex function - because it deals with not just management issues but human ones as well.

Human resource management can support the goal of creating a high-performance work system. Helping organizations find and keep the best persons for the organization allows the organization to have employees with broad skills and strong motivation. With the changing world, human resource management must change as well to provide organizations with their needs.
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PostSubject: Assignment 9: HRM roles   Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:12 am

Interview a personnel/human resource manager on his concept on the nature, scope and role of human resource management. Do you agree with him? Explain. Is his concept similar to that of the management of his organization? If not, ask him how the differences are settled.

Human resource management (HRM) is the strategic and coherent approach to the management of an organization's most valued assets - the people working there who individually and collectively contribute to the achievement of the objectives of the business. The terms "human resource management" and "human resources" (HR) have largely replaced the term "personnel management" as a description of the processes involved in managing people in organizations. In simple sense, HRM means employing people, developing their resources, utilizing, maintaining and compensating their services in tune with the job and organizational requirement.
The Human Resources Management (HRM) function includes a variety of activities, and key among them is deciding what staffing needs you have and whether to use independent contractors or hire employees to fill these needs, recruiting and training the best employees, ensuring they are high performers, dealing with performance issues, and ensuring your personnel and management practices conform to various regulations. Activities also include managing your approach to employee benefits and compensation, employee records and personnel policies. Usually small businesses (for-profit or nonprofit) have to carry out these activities themselves because they can't yet afford part- or full-time help. However, they should always ensure that employees have -- and are aware of -- personnel policies which conform to current regulations. These policies are often in the form of employee manuals, which all employees have.
Note that some people distinguish a difference between HRM (a major management activity) and HRD (Human Resource Development, a profession). Those people might include HRM in HRD, explaining that HRD includes the broader range of activities to develop personnel inside of organizations, including, eg, career development, training, organization development, etc.
There is a long-standing argument about where HR-related functions should be organized into large organizations, eg, "should HR be in the Organization Development department or the other way around?"
The HRM function and HRD profession have undergone tremendous change over the past 20-30 years. Many years ago, large organizations looked to the "Personnel Department," mostly to manage the paperwork around hiring and paying people. More recently, organizations consider the "HR Department" as playing a major role in staffing, training and helping to manage people so that people and the organization are performing at maximum capability in a highly fulfilling manner.

Role of HRM:
• Strategic business partner
• Change management
• Employee champion
• Administration
The goal of human resource management is to help an organization to meet strategic goals by attracting, and maintaining employees and also to manage them effectively. The key word here perhaps is "fit", i.e. a HRM approach seeks to ensure a fit between the management of an organization's employees, and the overall strategic direction of the company.The basic premise of the academic theory of HRM is that humans are not machines, therefore we need to have an interdisciplinary examination of people in the workplace. Fields such as psychology, industrial engineering, industrial, Legal/Paralegal Studies and organizational psychology, industrial relations, sociology, and critical theories: postmodernism, post-structuralism play a major role. Many colleges and universities offer bachelor and master degrees in Human Resources Management.
Some industry commentators call the Human Resources function the last bastion of bureaucracy. Traditionally, the role of the Human Resource professional in many organizations has been to serve as the systematizing, policing arm of executive management.
In this role, the HR professional served executive agendas well, but was frequently viewed as a road block by much of the rest of the organization. While some need for this role occasionally remains — you wouldn’t want every manager putting his own spin on a sexual harassment policy, as an example — much of the HR role is transforming itself.
The role of the HR manager must parallel the needs of his or her changing organization. Successful organizations are becoming more adaptive, resilient, quick to change direction and customer-centered. Within this environment, the HR professional, who is considered necessary by line managers, is a strategic partner, an employee sponsor or advocate and a change mentor.
In today’s organizations, to guarantee their viability and ability to contribute, HR managers need to think of themselves as strategic partners. In this role, the HR person contributes to the development of and the accomplishment of the organization-wide business plan and objectives.
The HR business objectives are established to support the attainment of the overall strategic business plan and objectives. The tactical HR representative is deeply knowledgeable about the design of work systems in which people succeed and contribute. This strategic partnership impacts HR services such as the design of work positions; hiring; reward, recognition and strategic pay; performance development and appraisal systems; career and succession planning; and employee development.
As an employee sponsor or advocate, the HR manager plays an integral role in organizational success via his knowledge about and advocacy of people. This advocacy includes expertise in how to create a work environment in which people will choose to be motivated, contributing, and happy.
Fostering effective methods of goal setting, communication and empowerment through responsibility, builds employee ownership of the organization. The HR professional helps establish the organizational culture and climate in which people have the competency, concern and commitment to serve customers well.
In this role, the HR manager provides employee development opportunities, employee assistance programs, gainsharing and profit-sharing strategies, organization development interventions, due process approaches to problem solving and regularly scheduled communication opportunities.
The constant evaluation of the effectiveness of the organization results in the need for the HR professional to frequently champion change. Both knowledge about and the ability to execute successful change strategies make the HR professional exceptionally valued. Knowing how to link change to the strategic needs of the organization will minimize employee dissatisfaction and resistance to change.
The HR professional contributes to the organization by constantly assessing the effectiveness of the HR function. He also sponsors change in other departments and in work practices. To promote the overall success of his organization, he champions the identification of the organizational mission, vision, values, goals and action plans. Finally, he helps determine the measures that will tell his organization how well it is succeeding in all of this.
…I am convinced by the HR manager about the roles and the functions of the human resource management in an organization. In fact he is very professional in elaborating all of those things. Therefore I very much agree.

Reference: http://humanresources.about.com/od/hrbasicsfaq/a/hr_role.htm
http://managementhelp.org/hr_mgmnt/hr_mgmnt.htm
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PostSubject: Assignment#9: The concept on the nature, scope and role of human resource management   Wed Oct 14, 2009 11:36 am



The concept on the nature, scope and role of human resource management


Our group interviewed one of the HR personnel of the NCCC. But I supported my answers on the other websites that related to the topics and answers of MS. HR personnel of NCCC.

Arrow Nature- Human Resource Management is a process of bringing people and organizations together so that the goals of each are met. The various features of HRM include:
Exclamation It is pervasive in nature as it is present in all enterprises.
Exclamation Its focus is on results rather than on rules.
Exclamation It tries to help employees deve¬lop their potential fully.
Exclamation It encourages employees to give their best to the organization.
Exclamation It is all about people at work, both as individuals and groups.
Exclamation It tries to put people on assigned jobs in order to produce good results.
Exclamation It helps an organization meet its goals in the future by providing for competent and well-moti¬vated employees.
Exclamation It tries to build and maintain cordial relations between people working at various levels in the organization.
Exclamation It is a multi-disciplinary activity, utilizing knowledge and inputs drawn from psychology, econo¬mics, etc.

Arrow Scope- The scope of HRM is very wide:
1. Exclamation Personnel aspect-This is concerned with manpower planning, recruitment, selection, placement, transfer, promotion, training and development, layoff and retrenchment, remuneration, incentives, productivity etc.
2. Exclamation Welfare aspect-It deals with working conditions and amenities such as canteens, creches, rest and lunch rooms, housing, transport, medical assistance, education, health and safety, recreation facilities, etc.
3. Exclamation Industrial relations aspect-This covers union-management relations, joint consultation, collective bargaining, grievance and disciplinary procedures, settlement of disputes, etc.

Arrow Role of Human Resource Management-
1. Exclamation Human Capital Steward- Act as a guide and facilitator in partnership with employees with the aim of achieving the highest return possible on a company’s human capitals investments.
2. Exclamation Knowledge facilitator- Facilitate both knowledge capital (held in explicit and implicit sources) and knowledge flows.
3. Exclamation Relationship Builder- Manages relationships between individuals and groups both internal and external to the organization to enhance social capital across the total value chain.
4. Exclamation Rapid Deployment Specialist- take responsibility for the development of flexible human capital resources with an emphasis on adaptability, tolerance, capacity to learn.

Do you agree with him/her?
For me, I agree with her because as HR personnel, since you are dealing with people, the above role, scope and nature of being HR personnel should present. But, the most important that I observed is that, the HR personnel should be approachable because the people in the organizations are going on you when they have some concerns.

Is his concept similar to that of the management of his organization?
Hmmmm…. As she said, yes. Because the organization as I observed is going well according to the function of what he/she handles. The NCCC is very well in implementing the role of each and everyone. But as the HR personnel said that the depart should conduct a seminars or activities to those freshly hired in the company because in her experienced, she said that the experience and time of working in the company is the only factor that develop her as HR personnel.


References:
http://ezinearticles.com/?Human-Resource-Management---Nature,-Scope,-Objectives-and-Function&id=2658370
http://www.12manage.com/description_human_resource_management_roles.html




blog: http://jags-in-love.blogspot.com/2009/10/concept-on-nature-scope-and-role-of.html


Last edited by joverly gonzales on Sat Oct 17, 2009 3:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 9 (Due: September 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Wed Oct 14, 2009 5:30 pm

Interview a personnel/human resource manager on his concept on the nature, scope and role of human resource management. Do you agree with him? Explain. Is his concept similar to that of the management of his organization? If not, ask him how the differences are settled. (1500 words)
Due: September 14, 2009, 13:00hrs

During the interview, I was amazed because I thought the respondent personnel of the company I chose is strict and can’t understand the objective of my interview. I waited in the lobby since she was busy answering phone calls. I was upset because I thought I am disturbing her so much. But in the end, I was wrong. The lady sitting in front is not quite old to be in her age because he acts like my age. She always wears smiles during our conversation.
I asked her what’s in her that she keeps on smiling, she told me that being in her position she should always wear smile since she is the HR Assistant. I ask her the questions direct to the point and presented the data I have researched over the net. She consequently agreed everything that goes beyond my data. And here it is.

Human resources may be defined as the total knowledge, skills, creative abilities, talents and aptitudes of an organization's workforce, as well as the values, attitudes, approaches and beliefs of the individuals involved in the affairs of the organization. It is the sum total or aggregate of inherent abilities, acquired knowledge and skills represented by the talents and aptitudes of the persons employed in the organization.
The human resources are multi¬dimensional in nature. From the national point of view, human resources may be defined as the knowledge, skills, creative abilities, talents and aptitudes obtained in the population; whereas from the view¬point of the individual enterprise, they represent the total of the inherent abilities, acquired knowledge and skills as exemplified in the talents and aptitudes of its employees.
Human Resource Manage¬ment: Nature
Human Resource Management is a process of bringing people and organizations together so that the goals of each are met. The various features of HRM include:
• It is pervasive in nature as it is present in all enterprises.
• Its focus is on results rather than on rules.
• It tries to help employees deve¬lop their potential fully.
• It encourages employees to give their best to the organization.
• It is all about people at work, both as individuals and groups.
• It tries to put people on assigned jobs in order to produce good results.
• It helps an organization meet its goals in the future by providing for competent and well-moti¬vated employees.
• It tries to build and maintain cordial relations between people working at various levels in the organization.
• It is a multi-disciplinary activity, utilizing knowledge and inputs drawn from psychology, econo¬mics, etc.
Human Resource Manage¬ment: Scope
The scope of HRM is very wide:
1. Personnel aspect-This is con¬cerned with manpower planning, recruitment, selection, place¬ment, transfer, promotion, train¬ing and development, layoff and retrenchment, remuneration, incentives, productivity etc.
2. Welfare aspect-It deals with working conditions and ameni¬ties such as canteens, creches, rest and lunch rooms, housing, transport, medical assistance, education, health and safety, recreation facilities, etc.
3. Industrial relations aspect-This covers union-management rela¬tions, joint consultation, collec¬tive bargaining, grievance and disciplinary procedures, settle¬ment of disputes, etc.
Human Resource Manage¬ment: Objectives
To help the organization reach its goals.
To ensure effective utilization and maximum develop¬ment of human resources.
To ensure respect for human beings. To identify and satisfy the needs of individuals.
To ensure reconciliation of indivi¬dual goals with those of the organization.
To achieve and maintain high morale among employees.
To provide the organization with well-trained and well-motivated employees.
To increase to the fullest the employee's job satisfaction and self-actualization.
To develop and maintain a quality of work life.
To be ethically and socially res¬ponsive to the needs of society.
To develop overall personality of each employee in its multi¬dimensional aspect.
To enhance employee's capabi¬lities to perform the present job.
To equip the employees with precision and clarity in trans¬action of business.
To inculcate the sense of team spirit, team work and inter-team collaboration.
Human Resource Manage¬ment: Functions
In order to achieve the above objectives, Human Resource Manage¬ment undertakes the following activi¬ties:
1. Human resource or manpower planning.
2. Recruitment, selection and place¬ment of personnel.
3. Training and development of employees.
4. Appraisal of performance of employees.
5. Taking corrective steps such as transfer from one job to another.
6. Remuneration of employees.
7. Social security and welfare of employees.
8. Setting general and specific management policy for organiza¬tional relationship.
9. Collective bargaining, contract negotiation and grievance hand¬ling.
10. Staffing the organization.
11. Aiding in the self-development of employees at all levels.
12. Developing and maintaining motivation for workers by pro¬viding incentives.
13. Reviewing and auditing man¬power management in the organization
14. Potential Appraisal. Feedback Counseling.
15. Role Analysis for job occupants.
16. Job Rotation.
17. Quality Circle, Organization development and Quality of Working Life.
I was so pleased hearing that she agreed upon the data. She told me that it is not easy being in her position since she is assigned to take all the responsibility over the employees. Her role in the company is very vital.
After the long conversation, she told me to go back and after I graduated I’ll apply because she will eventually hire me and I don’t know the reason why she told me that. I’m glad I learned a lot from her.
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emilio jopia jr.



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PostSubject: HRM: Assginment 9   Fri Oct 16, 2009 10:55 am

Interview a personnel/human resource manager on his concept on the nature, scope and role of human resource management. Do you agree with him? Explain. Is his concept similar to that of the management of his organization? If not, ask him how the differences are settled.


Human Resource Management
The Human Resources Management (HRM) function includes a variety of activities, and key among them is deciding what staffing needs you have and whether to use independent contractors or hire employees to fill these needs, recruiting and training the best employees, ensuring they are high performers, dealing with performance issues, and ensuring your personnel and management practices conform to various regulations. Activities also include managing your approach to employee benefits and compensation, employee records and personnel policies. Usually small businesses (for-profit or nonprofit) have to carry out these activities themselves because they can't yet afford part- or full-time help. However, they should always ensure that employees have -- and are aware of -- personnel policies which conform to current regulations. These policies are often in the form of employee manuals, which all employees have.

The strategic and coherent approach to the management of an organization's most valued assets - the people working there who individually and collectively contribute to the achievement of the objectives of the business.The terms "human resource management" and "human resources" (HR) have largely replaced the term "personnel management" as a description of the processes involved in managing people in organizations. In simple sense, HRM means employing people, developing their resources, utilizing, maintaining and compensating their services in tune with the job and organizational requirement.

Nature of Human Resource Management

Human Resource Management is a process of bringing people and organizations together so that the goals of each are met. The various features of HRM include:
• It is pervasive in nature as it is present in all enterprises.
• Its focus is on results rather than on rules.
• It tries to help employees deve¬lop their potential fully.
• It encourages employees to give their best to the organization.
• It is all about people at work, both as individuals and groups.
• It tries to put people on assigned jobs in order to produce good results.
• It helps an organization meet its goals in the future by providing for competent and well-moti¬vated employees.
• It tries to build and maintain cordial relations between people working at various levels in the organization.
• It is a multi-disciplinary activity, utilizing knowledge and inputs drawn from psychology, econo¬mics, etc.
Role of Human Resource Management

PLANNING AND ORGANIZING FOR WORK, PEOPLE AND HR
M

STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE
Develop Human Resource plans and strategies aligned to the organization’s strategic direction and business strategy. Provide tools and tactics to enhance execution of these strategies. Integrate HRM with current and pending legislation and socio-political changes. Integrate Human Resource Management with general organisational management. Manage the interface between HRM processes and systems. Formulate and communicate HRM policies. Scan the environment (both international and national) and identify emerging trends that will affect the organization and the management of people therein. Assess the long-term impact of short-term decisions on people. Manage people related
issues accompanying mergers, alliances and acquisitions. Express (embody) the
philosophy and values regarding people management in the organisation.
CHANGE MANAGEMENT
Advise management on implications of change for employees. Co-ordinate &
facilitate the change process. Facilitate changed relationships. Provide support
structures for employees during change. Deliberate and proactive
management of the changing environment and its implications for work and
the organization.
CORPORATE WELLNESS MANAGEMENT
Develop and communicate policies and procedures with regard to the management of well being. Manage occupational health and safety. Manage wellbeing (Employee Assistance programs & Health Promotion programs).

PEOPLE ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT

STAFFING THE ORGANIZATION

As anexample, each of the functions of this role is further unpacked in terms of
activities.

Human Resource Planning (linked to strategic perspective)

Determining requirements of jobs
Recruitment of staff for the organisation
Selection of human resources
Placement of staff
Induction and orientation
Management of a-typical employment situations.
Managementof termination

TRAINING &DEVELOPMENT
• PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
• INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS



ADMINISTRATION OF POLICIES, PROGRAMMES & PRACTICES

• COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT
• INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
• ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT
• FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT


According to Mr. Alex Somera, an HR Personnel of Emcor, the Human Resource Department of Emcor is the responsible for managing the Human Resources. For looking for possible employees to fill in vacancies, to analyze cause of the problems of unusual behavior of employees in the working environment. The human Resource department is also responsible for the development of the morale of every employee from the simplest laborer to the highest position in the organization. He also said that all of the transaction regarding the employee can be found in the Human Resource-Department for example like the processing of the Salary, Accounting Division, assist the employee for their basic needs like medication, loan etc. He said that the main purpose of the HRM is to attain the needs of the employees. The welfare of the employees is the topmost priority of the HRD, He said that the human force is the responsible that is why the organization generates, the employees are the reason and responsible for the survival of the industry that is why they have to take care of them, they are the one who builds and keep the organization survive but they could also be the reason to destabilize the industry.
I agree with Mr. Alex Somera, no company will survive without taking care of their human resources. An employee would always complain if there are any irregularities in the organization. If the HRD won’t take action on that, that would cause a problem, maybe it will take effect on the working performance of their employees.
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 9 (Due: September 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   

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Assignment 9 (Due: September 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)
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